Top Secret!‘s Backwards Scene Forwards

03/08/2011

Here’s the original scene as presented in the 1984 Zucker/Abrahams comedy, Top Secret! With obvious and clever staging they made it seem as if the actors were speaking Swedish, when in fact it was simply shot in reverse manner.

(YouTube Link)

Now, thanks to the YouTube editing prowess of user reishiki, we can see how this scene actually looked when filmed. Also, I either never knew or had completely forgotten that the bookstore guy is played by Peter (Grand Moff Tarkin) Cushing.

(YouTube Link)


Luke Skywalker and Commander Adama Together

08/20/2010

Although I can find no information to support it, my theory is a young Edward James Olmos is the guy who picks up Mark Hammil’s character Kenny on his way to Las Vegas in the 1978 film, Corvette Summer. Imdb has a mysterious chararacter called “Uncredited” played by some actor named Rio, who doesn’t seem to exist, and Wikipedia/Olmos’ bio is silent on the subject. Sounds to me like this was before Olmos was serious about acting, and used a fake name. I don’t blame him for not taking credit, but I’m shocked I’m the first one to notice this obvious piece of acting history.

Be my guest, and watch the scene. Tell me this isn’t a young Adama giving a young Skywalker a ride.

(YouTube Link)

The fact that Gandalf/Ian McKellan makes an appearance in this movie as a pornographer makes this claim even more plausible.

UPDATE: Well, after further investigation, the truth is revealed. It sure looks like a young EJO, but according to the Unofficial Corvette Summer site, that’s Isaac Ruiz Jr., who had a part on Chico and the Man.


A Gentler Tickler

08/15/2010

Detroit Publishing Co.

100 years have gone by since this thrill ride, “The Tickler,” in Cincinnati promised the experience would be “not as rough as last season.”

Click for enormous size (Shorpy).


Jenette Goldstein

08/09/2010

20th Century Fox

When James Cameron put out a casting call for American actors in London for his production of Aliens, he got a jewel of an actress by the name of Jenette Goldstein, who jokingly auditioned for the part of tough Latino Marine, Vasquez. She not only stole many scenes in the sci-fi epic, but Cameron’s heart as well, ending up in two more of his gargantuan box office smashes, although audiences may have not recognized her. She’s gained a reputation as being a chameleon.

Everyone remembers her roles, especially Vasquez. Perhaps the funniest moment in Aliens is when Bill Paxton’s Hudson asks her (as she’s flexing some mad pull-ups) if she’s ever been mistaken for a man. Without missing a beat, she retorts, “No, have you?” That was her breakout performance, after studying acting in Los Angeles and competing alongside peers like Val Kilmer and Kevin Spacey.

Artisan Home Entertainment

She then went on to an eclectic film career, playing John Connor’s foster mother in Terminator 2: Judgement Day. “Wolfie’s fine, honey. Where are you?” Also of note is her role in Star Trek: Generations, and an overlooked addition to my post about 3 actors in 2 movies. Jenette, Bill Paxton, and Lance Henriksen were all in both Aliens and Near Dark.

Paramount

The role of the Irish mother in Cameron’s Titanic is probably the most chameleon-like of her performances. A master of dialects and physically altering her persona, Goldstein really shines in this small, yet powerful role. Personally, I was totally unaware that the actress playing this character was the same woman who wielded one of the biggest guns in cinematic history while screaming “Let’s rock!” and killing voracious aliens.

She also went to the same high school as some of our favorite stars, like Angelina Jolie, Nicholas Cage, and Richard Dreyfuss. I think it’s telling that in the credits for Aliens, her character is actually named Jenette Vasquez. Hats (and bandannas) off, Ms. Goldstein; we really really like you!

IMDB


The Dark Side… No Moon

07/14/2010

Awesome design from fyeahgeekgirls.

Thanks Minnesotastan.


Wish I Was There

07/12/2010

Print by David O'Daniel

It’s really hard to find this movie anywhere, unless you have Netflix, but the best place to see this 1927 masterpiece by Fritz Lang would be at a theater. Portland’s Cinema 21 to the rescue! The Complete Metropolis ends its run there on a couple of days. I’ll be sure to catch a showing before that happens.


Hot Shot Eastbound

07/01/2010

Photo: O Winston Link

From Iconic Images:

Although his photos exuded spontaneity, they were often the result of elaborate preparations and darkroom manipulations. “Hot Shot East Bound” was photographed on August 2, 1956, in Iaeger, West Virginia, in an effort to depict small-town American life at the end of an era. As the steam engine symbolically exits the frame, a young couple in Link’s own 1952 Buick convertible takes center stage, both literally and metaphorically. Later, in his darkroom, Link added the U.S. Air Force Sabre airplane on the movie screen to extend this metaphoric power. The photo was a poignant display of a cultural lifestyle in speedy transition. The 50s marked the beginning of excess, decadence, and conspicuous consumption. For Link, no landscape embodied this as effectively as the drive-in theater, a cultural space first created in 1928 by Richard Hollingshead in response to the United State’s burgeoning car culture.


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